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When it comes to auto insurance, if you choose the state minimum liability auto insurance limits at $30,000 per person up to $60,000 per accident and $25,000 property damage coverage, you would be uninsured for the following ten items.

For more coverage you will want to purchase higher liability limits and coverage for physical damage to your vehicle.  

Here are 10 things that you may have to pay for with only a bare-bones policy:

1. Severe damage to others

The other driver or drivers can sue if you're involved in a major accident. Found to be at fault and you could be responsible for all the expenses tied to the crash, from property damage to hospital costs. An insurer will pay up to your coverage limits, but the rest could be on you. Your savings, property and even wages may be targeted.

In Texas, our state liability minimum is :

  • $30,000 per injured person for bodily injury.
  • $60,000 per accident for bodily injury.
  • $25,000 for property damage.

These levels are likely to be inadequate after a bad accident.    We recommend no less than $100,000 of bodily injury protection per person and $300,000 per accident, adding that the extra coverage does not add much premium.

2. Hail damage

Hail is just one of the hazards that bad weather can bring.  To have coverage for hail damage,  you would need to add comprehensive coverage to give you the physical damage coverage to your vehicles.

Comprehensive insurance basically covers situations that are 'other than collision,' such as theft, fire, vandalism or damage arising from natural events, like a hail storm.

Jeanne M. Salvatore, the III's senior vice president and consumer spokeswoman, adds that comprehensive covers "various winter-related disasters, such as a tree or chunk of ice that falls on a car, as well as a lightning strike."

 

3. Accident damage caused by you or another driver

You'll need optional collision insurance to repair or replace your car after an accident.

Collision covers your insured vehicle for physical damage that your car sustains when it hits, or is hit by, another vehicle or another object.


4. Damage from striking a deer or other animal

Comprehensive or also known as other than collision coverage is required if you hit a deer. Or have other problems caused by animals, such as marauding bears eager for loot.

1.2 million deer-vehicle collisions occurred nationwide between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2013.

 

5. Damage from hitting a pole in the parking lot

Parking lot accidents can sneak up on you, especially during the heavy shopping days surrounding the holidays. What if you hit a pole or another obstacle while maneuvering through a crowded lot? You'll need collision coverage.


6. Replacing a stolen vehicle

Stolen car? You'll need comprehensive. It covers the theft of your whole vehicle and parts or equipment that are permanently attached or installed to your vehicle.

Vehicle theft resulted in more than $4.3 billion in losses in 2012, with the average loss reaching $6,019.

 

7. Flooding damage

Comprehensive covers it, which is especially important in high rainfall or hurricane regions like Florida and the Gulf states. Beyond flooding damage, comprehensive can also help with havoc from tornadoes and even volcanic eruptions.

Gusner advises planning ahead when buying the protection. "If you don't have comprehensive, you need to get it before hurricane or flood warnings are given for your area," she says. "Insurance companies can't add new coverage or write a new insurance policy when a storm warning has been issued."

 

 

8. Damages caused by an uninsured driver

To cover hit and run accidents, drivers should consider adding uninsured motorist (UM) or underinsured motorist coverage (UIM) to their policy. UM coverage will reimburse you, a member of your family, or a designated driver for bodily injuries caused by an uninsured motorist or a hit-and-run driver. UIM comes into play when an at-fault driver has insufficient insurance to pay for your total loss. UIM also provides coverage if you're walking and hit by a car.


9. Personal injury costs from an accident

To ensure your hospital bills are paid beyond your bodily injury limits, there's medical payments (MedPay) and personal injury protection (PIP) coverage.

Both usually protect you, passengers and other authorized drivers of your vehicle who are injured in an accident. They also cover you and your family when injured while riding in someone else's car or if you're hit by a vehicle while walking.

PIP is typically more far-reaching and pays for wages lost because of an accident, something MedPay doesn't. Both PIP and MedPay usually help with funeral expenses.

 

(Photo: fabiodevilla / Shutterstock.com)

10. Fire damages

What do you need to cover costs related to a car fire? Again, it's comprehensive.

The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) says a vehicle fire breaks out every 96 seconds in the U.S. Most are from accidents, but non-crash fires can start because of electrical problems or faulty fuel systems. Comprehensive also safeguards you if your car is damaged from a blaze caused by a recalled part.

To obtain better auto insurance coverages please contact an independent insurance agency like us who can offer multiple carriers.

Suzanne Brown Insurance Agency

A Texas Independent Insurance Agency with over 40 insurance carriers

www.SuzanneBrownAgency.com

281-558-2210


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